Wednesday, April 9, 2014

Something From Nothing #23: Light and Crispy Homemade Waffles

Bacon Waffles

While I was doing my last post for brined chicken strips, I thought it would be a cute photo to set some on top of a couple of waffles. It just so happens that I have a killer recipe for waffles that I have used for years, given to me by my mother, so I baked some up. Little did I know that this was going to cause such a sensation at my house.

Although the combination of chicken and waffles has probably been eaten for as long as they have both been around, it was made famous most recently by Long Beach, CA restaurant, Roscoe's House of Chicken and Waffles. Rumor has it that this dynamic duo was served here to late night diners who didn't know whether is was time for breakfast or dinner, so they ate a little of both. It soon caught on and made Roscoe's famous.

I can attest to the fact that the combination of light, fluffy, crispy waffles and the slightly salty brined and fried chicken, brought together with the sweetness of the maple syrup is probably one of the best flavor profiles on earth. I can totally understand why this is loved by so many people, including my husband and son.

Seeing that most of us don't have Roscoe's down the street, I feel it is my duty as a mom and food lover to provide you with great recipes for both. Since my last post was about chicken, this one of course had to be all about the waffles. This recipe is great, and while delicious on its own, can be easily customized with your favorite add-ons sprinkled in. My favorite is bacon, but they are also good with a couple of chocolate chips, a sprinkling of cheese, some berries, toasted pecans or anything else you might think up.


Waffles

I really hate to call a recipe "something from nothing" that needs a special appliance to be prepared, but as you will see in some of the photos, waffle irons don't have to be fancy to work. Take mine for example. I bought this thing at Walmart almost 15 years ago for probably $10.00. It isn't much to look at, has a hot spot in the middle and is stained from years of use and being sprayed down with non-stick cooking spray, but it has never let me down. As you can see, I am just like many of you out there. I don't always have the best kitchen appliances or the fanciest gadgets, but no one knows that when I set their plate down on the table.

1-3/4 cups flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1-3/4 cup milk
1/2 cup cooking oil (if I'm also cooking bacon, I replace 1 tablespoon of the cooking oil with 1 tablespoon of bacon drippings for flavor)
2 room temperature eggs, divided

Place the flour, baking powder and salt in a medium size bowl; stir well and set aside.

In a medium size bowl, whisk together the milk, oil and egg yolks. Make a well in the middle of the flour mixture and stir in the milk mixture until it is completely combined. Don't worry if it is a bit lumpy, the lumps will disappear as the waffles cook; set aside.

Preheat waffle iron while you finish your batter.

Place the egg whites in a medium size bowl. Beat whites with an electric mixer until stiff peaks form. Fold the whites into the batter.

Yep, that's my old, ugly and stained waffle maker in the background. It's clean, but it's ugly. If it ever stops working, I'll buy a pretty one I promise.

Depending on the size of your waffle iron, pour 1/3 - 1/2 of a cup of batter into the hot waffle iron which you have lightly sprayed with non-stick cooking spray. Bake waffles until the ready light on your waffle iron lights up, or until steam is no longer being emitted. Remove waffles and serve or place on a wire rack in a warm oven while the rest are prepared. If you place them on a plate at this point waiting for the rest to cook, they will often times get soggy on the bottom.


This recipe makes about 12 waffles. I usually have some left over, and cool them completely before placing them in a zipper seal freezer bag and freezing them. To reheat, remove from the freezer and thaw about 5 minutes, toast lightly in the toaster, watching carefully so they do not burn.



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